Friday, August 18, 2017

BLACKBIRD: Finding Your Inner Joy

Like all Thrushes, Blackbird (Turdus merula) is known for his singing voice. A familiar sight in the countryside of Europe, He entertains people with his melodies. Originally an inhabitant of the woodlands of Europe and Asia, Blackbird began frequenting parks in the 1800s. By the 1900s, He moved into the cities. Now a familiar sight, Blackbird makes Himself at home most anywhere.

Blackbird’s rich mellow song and striking appearance makes Him noticeable. Because of his black color and sweet song, the ancient Greeks considered Blackbird a destructive bird that led people into bad situations. Later, Christians claimed that Satan took the shape of Blackbird to tempt saints to forget their vows.

However in Druidic traditions, Blackbird is the Gateway between the Worlds of Reality and Dreams. A Sacred Bird, He is also one of the five oldest animals. Because of his sunny song and black color, Blackbird is also the Bird of the Forge. His song calls people to create lives of passion and purpose.

Singing his enchanting song, Blackbird puts people in touch with their inner joy. From this perky little bird comes a sense of contentedness about life. Listen to Blackbird’s song and discover your own inner joy.

Blackbird’s Wisdom Includes:
Answering the Inner Call of Self
Living a Life of Passion and Purpose
Being the Gateway between Worlds
Domestic Happiness
Singing Your Own Melody
Harmony in All Things
Finding Beauty in Unexpected Places
Note: Three unrelated birds are called Blackbird. Red-Winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) and Yellow-head Blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus) of North America are members of the Troupial Family. Blackbird (Turdus merula) of Europe is a close cousin of American Robin (Turdus migratorius).

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Clownfish: Cooperation

Clownfish belongs to a small, brightly colored Fish Family called Damselfish. Brilliantly colored Clownfish gets his name from his bright stripes, usually orange, black and white. Young Clownfish usually have more stripes than their Elders.

Clownfish is especially known for his relationship with Sea Anemone. Working with his host Anemone, Clownfish swims out in the coral reef to attract larger Fish nearby. After luring a Fish back to Anemone, Clownfish escapes by swimming inside Sea Anemone. Meanwhile, Anemone stings the preoccupied Fish with its tentacles. After Anemone consumes the Fish, Clownfish feeds on the remains.

Clownfish lives in a group inside Sea Anemone. The largest of the group is a breeding Female, the second largest is a breeding Male. Everyone else is male. Because their bodies are coated with mucus, Clownfish are immune to Sea Anemone’s poison.

As a Clownfish moves up the social ladder, He becomes larger and eventually changes sex. The younger Clownfish limit their growth to avoid the wrath of older Clownfish. Meanwhile, Father Clownfish cares for his Young until They are ready to leave the Anemone to join a new group at another Anemone.

Clownfish teach cooperation with those different from you. Clownfish and Sea Anemone live together for their mutual good. Clownfish receives food, shelter, and protection from Sea Anemone. In return, Clownfish protects Anemone by chasing away Butterfly Fish that like to bite off the ends of Anemone’s tentacles.
Clownfish’ Wisdom Includes:
Making Friends with Unlikely People
Being Flexible in Groups
How to be Distinctive and Well-Known
Being a Homebody

Friday, August 04, 2017

Chipmunk: Wise Use of Resources

The Chipmunk, a small striped-rodent, is a member of the Squirrel Family. Scientists usually divide the twenty five species of chipmunks into three groups – the Western Chipmunks (the largest group): Nectamias, the Eastern Chipmunk: Tamias, and the Siberian Chipmunk: Eutamias. The root “tamis” is Greek for steward, which reflects this species’ role in plant dispersal.

Chipmunk is named for her call – “chip-chip,” which sounds like a shrill bird-like chirp. Besides the chip-chip, She also employs a deep chuck, a trill, and a high-pitched startle call. Upon hearing her faint high chip, a dog’s ears will perk up. By the time the dog reacts, Chipmunk will be safe underground.

Living in North America and Siberia, Chipmunk is famous for her propensity to store seeds. People often see Her scurrying about with bulging cheeks full of seeds. Her cheeks can expand to equal her size. They allow Chipmunk to carry her food back to her burrow to eat. During the year, She collects and stores seeds in her vast complex of tunnels, doing most of her activity in the fall.

Besides seeds, Chipmunk will eat frogs and birds. Since She is an omnivore, She adds fungi and vegetables to her diet. Her eating habits help to spread various fungus and tree species. With the fungi, Chipmunk disperses the spores in several ways from storing the fungus to breaking it apart. By harvesting and hoarding seeds, She spreads many species of trees throughout the forest.

The underground burrow of Chipmunk has three areas for food, sleeping, and waste. Preferring sloping ground for drainage, She digs tunnels below the surface to her various chambers and for escape routes. Chipmunk can burrow through stone walls and concrete foundations, which makes Her a pest to some people. Except during mating season, Chipmunk lives by Herself in her home.

Chipmunk teaches people how to husband their resources. She stashes seeds to keep her well-supplied in food. During the winter, Chipmunk will “half-hibernate,” waking from time to time to eat. Some of the seeds, She eats right away, the others Chipmunk will save for the future. She also helps to disperse tree species, which in turn provides future sources of food. People can learn from Chipmunk how to save and when to use their various resources.